Arianators’ Favorite Ariana Grande Song of 2018 (VOTE)

Ariana Today is hosting once again the annual Arianators’ Favorite Ariana Grande Song!

This year, Ariana has released her most critically acclaimed album yet with Sweeteneralong with other collaborations. We wanted to focus on all of her four albums battling it out along with this year’s collaborations and a few fan favorite songs!

Visit our Twitter page and start voting for each of the songs battling it out!

CLICK HERE TO VOTE!

Last year, Into You took the crown for the second time in a row. Which song do you think will become the fan favorite of 2017? Check out the bracket and join in the fun!

Download the tournament bracket, or click the picture. Fill it out, play along, and vote below!

Ariana Grande is nominated at the 2018 GRAMMY Awards

On December 7th, the nominations for the 2018 GRAMMY Awards have been revealed, and Ariana has been nominated for two awards! Check out her nominations:

Pop Solo Performance

– Joanne (Piano Version) 
– Colors 
– Havana (Live) 
– God Is a Woman
– Better Now

Best Pop Vocal Album

– Camilla 
– Meaning of Life 
– sweetener
– Shawn Mendes 
– Beautiful Trauma 
– reputation

The awards will be held on February 10th, 2019, live from Staples Center in Los Angeles.

Ariana Grande honoured as Woman of the Year at the 2018 Billboard Women in Music

On December 6th, as Ariana Grande took the stage to accept the Woman of the Year award at this year’s Billboard Women In Music event, the 25-year-old singer followed up a sassy performance of “thank u, next” with a very Ariana-like quip: “Thank you so much for coming to my Quinceañera, I appreciate it.” Though it wasn’t Grande’s actual birthday, the rest of her speech served as sincere proof of the night’s biggest honor — whether she felt worthy of it or not.

After admitting that she felt “completely undeserving” of the Woman of the Year title, Grande went on to thank her team in a rather nervous fashion, suggesting that she’d forget everything she wanted to say because she was overwhelmed. But then something clicked as she began talking about the incredible year she’s had as an artist.

“I find it interesting that this has been one of the best years of my career and the worst of my life,” Grande said. “A lot of people would look at someone in my position right now as an artist that could be at her peak and think, ‘She’s really got her shit together, she’s really on it. She’s got it all.’ And I do, but as far as my personal life goes, I really have no idea what the fuck I’m doing.”

She laughed off her comment, but quickly followed up with a message of hope for her fans: “It’s been a very conflicting one, and I just want to say if you’re someone out there who has no idea what this next chapter is going to bring, you’re not alone in that.”

In true Ariana fashion, she quickly pulled it together and even threw in a silly remark (“I’m not going to cry, that’s really annoying,” she joked). Continuing her encouraging and heartfelt sentiment, she added, “I’m really looking forward to embracing whatever happens and whatever comes my way.”

As she wrapped up her speech, Grande shouted out her best friends Victoria Monet and Tayla Parx, with whom she made her highly anticipated (and teased) sweetener follow-up album. Even through the emotional moments and raw vulnerability, Grande held true to her “thank u, next” attitude as she welcomed what’s to come.

“I look forward to hopefully learning to give some of the love and forgiveness that I’ve given away so frivolously and easily to men in the past to myself, hopefully, this year,” she declared. “I have everything I’ve ever dreamt of having, and as of late I’ve discovered that it’s the things I’ve always had and the people I’ve always had that still make me the happiest.”

Source: billboard.com

Arrivals


Backstage

Performance


Speech


Ariana Grande’s Billboard Woman of the Year cover story

On December 5th, Ariana’s cover story for Billboard’s Woman In Music has been posted!


Ariana Grande is milly rocking in her seat behind the massive mixing console at Los Angeles’ Record Plant studio, a wide grin revealing the single dimple in her left cheek. Her new single, “Thank U, Next,” will not officially become her first Billboard Hot 100 No. 1 for another three days, but its explosive success is already making headlines. For Grande, the milestone is especially meaningful. It’s the exact kind of music she has wanted to make all along.

“It’s a Tommy Brown single!” she exclaims, hitting the arm of her chair for emphasis. Brown, a producer and songwriter, has been working with Grande since her 2013 debut, Yours Truly, and Grande is positively giddy at the prospect of their shared musical breakthrough. “I can’t believe it but, like, so can. It’s me and my besties tipsy off champagne — and me with a broken heart — just letting it out and having fun. I love this more than any other song I’ve ever put out.”

That kind of joy has been tough to come by in the past few months for Billboard’s Woman Of The Year, despite the fact that she has never had more career momentum. Grande’s fourth album, Sweetener, became her third No. 1 on the Billboard 200 in August, breaking streaming records while earning critical acclaim. So far it has produced two top 10 singles on the Hot 100, with a third, “Breathin,” now at No. 13. But while she was in the middle of promoting the project, her dear friend, collaborator and ex-boyfriend Mac Miller died from an accidental overdose. Just over a month later, her whirlwind engagement to comedian Pete Davidson ended.

On this November afternoon, it’s still too soon for Grande to talk about what has happened in anything other than broad strokes. “I’m really lucky and really unlucky at the same time,” says the 25-year-old.

To sing about it, though, is another story. Not long after Miller’s death, Grande started spending all of her time with her closest friends and collaborators, including Brown, recording a new album (which she says will also be called Thank U, Next) at a studio across the street from her New York apartment. Though she has been in therapy since she was just a kid coping with her parents’ divorce — and is quick to espouse its benefits — right now the most healing comes when she’s standing behind a mic.

“When I felt myself saying, ‘’Cause her name is Ari,’ I knew it was a special line, but part of me was like, ‘Oh, my God, that’s kind of corny,’” says Grande, referring to the “Thank U, Next” lyric, a declaration of self-love. She tucks her bare legs inside a light-blue hoodie that reads “Beau Souci” (French for “beautiful worry”) and wraps her arms around them. “But the other part of me was like, ‘That’s beautiful and I need to keep it in.’ I know that once I put something into a song, then it’s real.”

Fittingly, the control room is decked out like a refuge: a small bouquet of white flowers, a single candle, a light projecting water ripples onto the ceiling. Grande, sporting an extension-less version of her signature ponytail, sips from a Starbucks iced soy latte while animatedly chatting about the music she has been working on — the only thing she’s really interested in discussing, the only thing that matters to her right now. As it turns out, a series of tragedies has given the star two unexpected gifts: the freedom to channel her hurt into the most raw and untempered music of her career, and the audacity to buck the pop music establishment — which, as Grande will note more quickly than anyone, is particularly entrenched when it comes to women.

She had the talent: the four-octave range and effortless vocal agility that led Gloria Estefan, after hearing the 8-year-old Grande sing “My Heart Will Go On” at a cruise-ship karaoke night, to tell her she was gifted. She had the support system: her close-knit family, familiar to anyone who follows the singer on social media. And she had the work ethic, performing in public regularly before the age of 10 and on Broadway by age 15. “When I was 6 years old, I just kind of decided that’s what I’m going to do with my life, period,” says Grande, who grew up in Boca Raton, Fla. “I manifested it. I knew I would. There was never really a doubt in my mind.”

The singer proceeded to do all she could to reach superstardom, and logged time in the teeny-bopper trenches at Nickelodeon. In 2011, she signed with Republic Records; not long after, she met Mac Miller. He was 20 and she was 19, so naturally they first talked on Twitter. The pair became fast friends, and she invited him to do a verse on her first album’s lead single, 2013’s bouncy ’90s throwback “The Way.” Grande told Billboard at the time that Miller was giving her Pro Tools pointers as they recorded. She added, “If you want to motivate Mac Miller to do anything, just bake cookies.”

Now, she looks back on the song as the first time she really captured her own musical style, what she had been searching for while growing up idolizing India.Arie. “When we made ‘The Way,’ I was like, ‘Oh, wow, I’m onto something here,’” says Grande. Her face dims slightly; just before this interview, she was working on a new song, which, when she plays it for me later, I realize is about Miller. “It felt like, ‘I should do this forever.’”

“The Way” reached No. 9 on the Hot 100, and like the rest of her debut, it holds up remarkably well. Babyface, one of the album’s producers, helped legitimize Grande’s long-held R&B aspirations. Nevertheless, when she released Yours Truly, Grande was still viewed as a preteen idol, thanks to her history on kiddie TV and diminutive size (she’s exactly 5 feet tall). So on her next two albums, she went even bigger, employing Max Martin and pursuing the kinds of pop hits that would make her undeniable to any listener.

“We started at home base — me,” Grande says of Yours Truly, “and then we went in this place where I kind of played the game for a little bit, and did the big, big, big pop records. Then we slowly started incorporating my soul back into it — and that’s where we’ve landed again with ‘Thank U, Next.’”

Grande has put in the work, done everything that was asked of her — all the tiny compromises that went along with playing the game — and kept her nose clean (with the exception of a little doughnut glaze, which she erased from the public’s memory with a cleverly self-deprecating sketch on one of the best Saturday Night Live hosting debuts in recent memory). She has hit songs and high Pitchfork ratings, to say nothing of her devoted fans, the Arianators. Grande’s late-night TV appearances — routine promotional stops for most stars — are events, thanks to her natural sense of comic timing and gift for impressions both sung and spoken (Google her doing Jennifer Coolidge). She followed all the rules, and arrived at what seemed like the top.

The singer has no regrets. “I got myself to a place where I would be able to do things like drop a surprise record and have it be the biggest single I’ve ever had,” she says now. But five years into her career, she hadn’t yet had a No. 1 Hot 100 song, and hadn’t found the ubiquity that she knew deep down she deserved.

Then, on May 22, 2017, a suicide bomber killed 23 people and injured 139 outside the arena in Manchester, England, where Grande had just finished performing as part of her Dangerous Woman Tour. Many of the victims were children.

Within weeks Grande was back, not just onstage but in Manchester, visiting survivors in the hospital and hosting the One Love Manchester benefit, which helped raise 23 million pounds (about $29 million) for the victims. She released her live rendition of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” from the benefit, during which she broke down in tears — though she still finished the performance — and donated the proceeds to the Red Cross. “Our response to this violence must be to come closer together, to help each other, to love more, to sing louder and to live more kindly and generously than we did before,” she wrote at the time.

She did exactly that with the album that followed, this summer’s Sweetener, an optimistic paean to her own healing; there was no dwelling on tragedy, only gentleness and positivity. The first single was titled “No Tears Left to Cry,” and the album concluded with the tender “Get Well Soon,” a five-minute, 22-second tribute to the Manchester victims. Meanwhile, she had found new contentment outside the studio with SNL star Davidson, in a relationship that she happily flaunted despite the tabloid frenzy that enveloped them both.

In a tweet a month ago, Grande summed up her feelings on what has happened since: “Remember when i was like hey i have no tears left to cry and the universe was like HAAAAAAAAA bitch u thought.”

This afternoon, Grande is often near tears, a fact she readily acknowledges. “I just hope you’re OK with me crying, because that’s not going to not happen,” she says, laughing even as she’s tearing up in the midst of talking about how she has coped with so much tragedy in such a short span of time. “I can’t even say ‘Good morning’ to anyone without crying.” The blessing, for both the singer and her fans, is the music. “I guess there’s not much I’m afraid of anymore,” she says, her normally silky voice tightening. “When life tries you with such serious shit so many times, your priorities change. I don’t give a shit. I just want to be happy and healthy — one day — and make music.”

Where she’s currently sitting — behind the mixing console — is just about the only place Grande feels like she has control. And she is, in her own words, a control freak. Though she won’t say that she has perfect pitch (“People tell me I do, but I’m not going to sit here and be like, ‘Yes, I do’”), when talking about her music, Grande betrays a craftsman’s obsession with arrangements and vocal harmonies. “I’ll hear something that’s on one track out of, like, a thousand in a session and be emailing the engineer about it,” she says. Martin and Pharrell Williams both let her “steer,” which is one of the reasons she has worked with them repeatedly. But not every man she has shared a studio with has been as willing to cede the reins.

“I’ve politely walked out of sessions before,” says Grande. “It has happened. I’m a small girl. People tend to underestimate that. And then I sit down and comp my own vocals and can produce my own session, and they’re like” — here she adopts an excellent impersonation of a dopey man — “‘Oh, I didn’t know you could do that.’ I’m like, ‘Believe it or not, there are plenty of tiny women that can do this.’” This is the Grande who digs for deep cuts, covering songs by eclectic bassist Thundercat and exchanging Instagram DMs with legendary jazz trumpeter Arturo Sandoval (the pair did a track together alongside Williams).

This is also the Grande who has been vocal about fighting sexism. Her recent single “God Is a Woman” might be the most obvious example, but even in 2015, in a Notes app manifesto that quoted Gloria Steinem, she was critiquing the media’s habit of defining famous women by their relationship status.

“I would just love to see a chart with as many women on top as men,” she says. “It’s just so male-dominated. It’s so easy for them. There are so many unbelievable female artists out there that try so much harder.”

Despite the industry barriers Grande is breaking down — she’s the only artist ever to have the lead single from each of her first four albums debut in the top 10 of the Hot 100, and the first woman in three years to have a single debut at No. 1 on the Hot 100 — she sometimes feels like she’s still pushing against an audience that wants her to fit into specific stereotypes. “They’re unable to accept the fact that women are a million things, and not just two,” she says. “You can be adorable and brilliant. You can be friendly and silly, and yet strong and indestructible. You can be professional and present and also sexual and fun.

“My dream has always been to be — obviously not a rapper, but, like, to put out music in the way that a rapper does. I feel like there are certain standards that pop women are held to that men aren’t. We have to do the teaser before the single, then do the single, and wait to do the preorder, and radio has to impact before the video, and we have to do the discount on this day, and all this shit. It’s just like, ‘Bruh, I just want to fucking talk to my fans and sing and write music and drop it the way these boys do. Why do they get to make records like that and I don’t?’ So I do and I did and I am, and I will continue to.” Grande pauses briefly, growing serious.

“And if it doesn’t work out the way ‘Thank U, Next’ did, that’s fine too! It is so exciting to see something be received well. That’s a beautiful thing. But it’s even more beautiful to be honest and just do something.” She sniffs, her eyes dampening. “To drop a record on a Saturday night because you feel like it, and because your heart’s going to explode if you don’t — to take back your narrative.”

Grande starts to cry in earnest, carefully wiping away tears so as not to smudge her winged eyeliner. “I don’t want to do what people tell me to do, I don’t want to conform to the pop star agenda. I want to do it on my own terms from now on. If I want to tour two albums at once, I’m going to tour two albums at once. If I want to drop a third album while I’m on tour [in 2019], I’ll do that too! Please. [“Thank U, Next” production duo] Social House is my opening act — you don’t think we’re going to have a studio on the bus? That we’re not going to be making records on the road? Of course we are. I want to be able to do what is authentic and honest and natural. It’s the only way that I’ve been able to survive.” She puts her face in her hands, resting her fingertips — adorned with perfectly manicured white oval nails — on her forehead.

Talking explicitly about the men in Grande’s life is a non-starter. She still loves all her songs, even “Pete Davidson.” (She also sent the Davidson in question “Thank U, Next” before releasing it: “I wasn’t going to blindside anybody,” she says.) The wound left by Miller’s death is, unsurprisingly, still raw. She expects Thanksgiving will be particularly hard, since she had spent the past few holidays in Pittsburgh with Miller’s family. At this point, these are the kinds of details that Grande already knows will be A1 on every gossip site. Her rise to fame has been punctuated by a series of public romances, which she writes off as a side effect of her workaholism. “This is how I meet people — I can’t just, like, meet someone at a bar,” she says. “I live fast and full-out, and I make mistakes, and I learn from them and I’m grateful no matter what happens.”

Grande has no plans to take a break, despite the fact that she has been working more or less constantly since the beginning of her career. When we meet, in early November, she’s in the midst of finishing Thank U, Next; prepping the video for the single; and preparing for her Sweetener World Tour, which starts in March 2019. “I feel like I’ve only scratched the surface of the artist I can be, and I just want to keep growing and practicing and getting better,” she says. “I never want to get lazy.”

The new album is Grande’s therapy and her catharsis. She invites her friends and collaborators — Brown, Social House, Victoria Monét, Tayla Parx and Doug Middlebrook — back into the control room to listen to it. Brown pops a bottle of pink Veuve Clicquot. “I don’t think I’ve ever consumed more alcohol than I have in the past month,” jokes Grande, cheered by their presence. “I am champagne. You know how people say we’re 60 percent water? I’m 60 percent pink Veuve Clicquot.”

Thank U, Next was mostly written in a week, with the people she’s toasting in the control room, and recorded in two weeks. Now comes the polishing phase and the addition of some tracks with Martin and his team. It was the product of a lot of “feminine energy and champagne and music and laughter and crying. This [album’s] not particularly uplifting,” she says. “A lot of it sounds really upbeat, but it’s actually a super sad chapter.”

The music is defiant — deep, bass-driven bangers with trap beats alternating with airy, sad ballads — and aesthetically more adventurous than anything she has ever released. Some of the lyrics are so unambiguously personal and gutting that even if the singer were up for talking about them, most questions would be redundant. But one of the more upbeat tunes, “7 Rings,” has a backstory Grande is happy to discuss.

“It was a… challenging fall day in New York,” she begins, cracking up. “Me and my friends went to Tiffany’s together, just because we needed some retail therapy. You know how when you’re waiting at Tiffany’s they give you lots of champagne? They got us very tipsy, so we bought seven engagement rings, and when I got back to the studio I gave everybody a friendship ring.” She flashes a diamond ring on her right hand; Monét and Parx are wearing them as well. “That’s why we have these, and that’s where the song idea came from.”

She goes to her phone and presses “play,” and a party-ready twist on “My Favorite Things” booms out of the speakers. Grande whispers some asides to her friends, who are bopping along to the song. Then she starts to dance around the room in her bare feet, alone and smiling.
WOMEN MAKE IT WORK
Behind the scenes of Grande’s success.

Donna Gryn
Senior vp marketing, Republic Records

My role: I’ve worked with Ariana since we launched “The Way” in 2013, overseeing marketing campaigns and working closely with her, management and Republic on every aspect of music strategy and rollout.

On Ariana: You might not know how involved she really is with everything we do. She really leads the charge in a way most artists don’t, and it’s one of the reasons she is so successful. Also worth mentioning: She often has us laughing out loud.

Rachel Bisdee
Senior director of international marketing, Republic Records

My role: The international team works with Scooter Braun Projects and Universal Music labels globally to create marketing campaigns and promotional strategy outside the United States, including Ariana’s TV, radio and awards show performances.

On Ariana: During an off-day in Australia, she rented a sightseeing bus for us. She took the mic and became our Broadway-musical-style tour guide and delivered sidesplitting commentary.

Jennifer McDaniels
GM, SB Projects

My role: I oversee all music ventures.

On Ariana: She did a series of Sweetener shows [in July], during which I got to see her interact with her fans on an intimate level. She remembered faces and names of fans that had been to other events, took requests and truly made them all feel special.

Jules Ferree
Head of brand partnerships, SB Projects

My role: With the support of the Scooter Braun Projects team, I work to cultivate, secure and manage Ariana’s various brand partnerships.

On Ariana: The second night of The Sweetener Sessions with AMEX in Chicago, she had finished performing the hourlong planned setlist, but continued the show a cappella for another 45 minutes, just to keep the love in the room flowing with her fans.

Source: billboard.com

Video Premiere: Ariana Grande – thank u, next

On November 30th, Ariana Grande released her highly anticipated music video for Thank U, Next! The video references iconic female movies including Mean Girls, Bring It On, 13 Going on 30, and Legally Blonde!

The music video is directed by Hannah Lux Davis. Check out the photos and videos below!

Behind The Scenes




Music Video

Ariana Grande earns first #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart with “thank u, next”

On November 12th, it was announced that Ariana Grande scores her first No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 (dated Nov. 17), as “Thank U, Next” rockets onto the chart at No. 1, arriving as the top-streamed and top-selling song of the week.

The track dethrones Maroon 5’s “Girls Like You,” featuring Cardi B, after seven weeks on top, although the collaboration ties for the second-most weeks spent at No. 1 in the history of the Radio Songs chart.

Grande’s First Hot 100 No. 1: “Next,” released on Republic Records, is Grande’s first Hot 100 No. 1, and the 1,079th in the chart’s 60-year history. She previously hit a No. 2 high with “Problem,” featuring Iggy Azalea, in 2014. “Next” also bows as her 11th Hot 100 top 10 and first since “God Is a Woman,” which reached No. 8 in September.

Grande reigns at last with her 35th Hot 100 entry. Among Hot 100 chart-topping acts, she ends the longest wait for her first No. 1 (by total chart appearances from a first entry) since Justin Bieber set the mark by earning his first leader with his 47th charted title, “What Do You Mean?,” in 2015.

Grande first hit the Hot 100 (debuting at No. 10) on April 13, 2013, with the eventual No. 9-peaking “The Way,” featuring Mac Miller.

No. 1 in Streams & Sales: “Next” launches with 55.5 million U.S. streams and 81,000 downloads sold in the week ending Nov. 8, according to Nielsen Music. Notably, the song debuts on the Hot 100 with just over five days of streaming and sales data, as it was released late Saturday, Nov. 3 (as the tracking week for those metrics runs Friday through Thursday). Grande has released two videos for the song so far: an audio clip upon its release and a lyric video Nov. 6.

With “Next,” Grande likewise earns her first No. 1 on the Streaming Songs chart and her fourth leader on Digital Song Sales, after “Problem,” for three weeks in 2014; “Bang Bang,” with Jessie J and Nicki Minaj (one week, 2014); and “No Tears Left to Cry” (one, this May).

“Next” also drew 11.3 million in all-format radio audience in the week ending Nov. 11.

“God Is a Woman” and “No Tears” are from Grande’s third Billboard 200 No. 1 album, Sweetener, which debuted atop the list dated Sept. 1, while “Next” is, as of now, a stand-alone track, with the song’s lyrics referencing past relationships with, among others, Big Sean, ex-finance Pete Davidson and the late Miller.

Meme-orable: As for its lyrics, aiding the buzz of “Next” are, specifically, its lines, “One taught me love / One taught me patience / One taught me pain,” which have sparked an onslaught of memes.

New at No. 1: “Next” is the 32nd single to debut at No. 1 on the Hot 100 and the first by a female artist in three years, since Adele’s “Hello” on the chart dated Nov. 14, 2015.

As noticed by chart-watcher Jake Rivera, “Next” is the fourth No. 1 debut of 2018, tying the record established in 1995, the first year that any single soared in at the summit. “Next” follows prior 2018 No. 1 bows for Childish Gambino’s “This Is America” (May 19) and Drake’s “Nice for What” (April 21) and “God’s Plan” (Feb. 3). The four No. 1 entrances in 1995: Michael Jackson’s “You Are Not Alone,” Mariah Carey’s “Fantasy,” Whitney Houston’s “Exhale (Shoop Shoop)” and Carey and Boyz II Men’s “One Sweet Day.”

Pop on top, again: As “Next” follows Maroon 5’s “Girls,” featuring Cardi B, at No. 1, two pop songs have led the Hot 100 in succession for the first time since Jan. 27, when Camila Cabello’s “Havana,” featuring Young Thug, replaced Ed Sheeran’s “Perfect.” “Next” also ends a record streak of 42 weeks of No. 1s with at least one credited rapper, from Young Thug (on “Havana”) to Cardi B (“Girls” and “I Like It,” with Bad Bunny and J Balvin). The run also included Drake (“Plan,” “Nice” and “In My Feelings”); Childish Gambino (“America”); Post Malone and Ty Dolla $ign (“Psycho”); and, XXXTentacion (“Sad!”).

As “Girls” drops to No. 2, pop songs rank at Nos. 1 and 2 on the Hot 100 in the same week for the first time since Jan. 27 (“Havana” and “Perfect,” respectively).

No. 1 is a woman: Grande is the first female soloist to top the Hot 100 unaccompanied by another act since Cardi B on Oct. 21, 2017, when her debut hit “Bodak Yellow (Money Moves)” spent its third and final week at No. 1.

Solo women in lead roles have led the Hot 100 for just three weeks (of 46 total so far) in 2018, thanks to “Next,” “I Like It” and “Havana.” That follows totals of six weeks in 2017 (via two No. 1s); 16 in 2016 (three No. 1s); 10 in 2015 (four No. 1s); 28 in 2014 (five No. 1s); and, 17 in 2013 (four No. 1s).

The last year in which lead solo women logged as few as three weeks at No. 1 on the Hot 100? 1975, thanks to one each for Linda Ronstadt (“You’re No Good”), Olivia Newton-John (“Have You Never Been Mellow”) and Minnie Riperton (“Lovin’ You”). (After the Hot 100’s Aug. 4, 1958, inception, no lead solo women reigned until June 27, 1960, when Connie Francis spent her first of two weeks on top with “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool.”)

‘Thank’s for the memories: Grande is thankful for the fourth Hot 100 No. 1 that includes “thank” in its title, following “Thank God I Found You,” by Carey featuring Joe and 98 Degrees (2000), “Thank God I’m a Country Boy,” by John Denver (1975), and “Thank You Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin”/”Everybody Is a Star,” by Sly & The Family Stone (1970).

(Grande’s new No. 1 also takes over as the highest-charting Hot 100 hit to begin with “Thank U”; Alanis Morissette’s “Thank U” reached No. 17 in 1998. The only other such title? “Thank U Very Much” by The Scaffold, a No. 69 hit in 1968. You’re welcome for that trivia …)

More Grande: Beyond the Hot 100’s top 10, Grande’s “Woman” holds at No. 20 and fellow Sweetener single “Breathin” charges 32-21, passing its prior No. 22 peak; following the Nov. 7 premiere of its official video, “Breathin” bounds by 64 percent to 12.2 million streams by 118 percent to 12,000 sold in the week ending Nov. 8 and claims the Hot 100’s top Streaming and Sales Gainer awards.

“Next” easily outperformed Maroon 5’s “Girls” in the tracking week, as the latter drops to No. 2 on the Hot 100 after seven weeks at No. 1. Still, “Girls” leads Radio Songs for a 16th week, with 109.3 million in audience (down 4 percent), tying for the second-longest No. 1 run in the chart’s 28-year history. “Girls” matches the longest Radio Songs reign this century, equaling Carey’s 16-week command with “We Belong Together” in 2005.

Source: billboard.com

Ariana Grande performs “thank u, next” and “breathin” on The Ellen Show

On November 7th, Ariana Grande more than delivered during her elaborate Thank U, Next performance on The Ellen Show Wednesday. She also performed her 3rd single from Sweetener, breathin. She didn’t pull the idea for her fancy white setup out of the sky, though; rather, the stage, choreography and theme were inspired by a scene from the 1996 cult comedy The First Wives Club.

Starring Bette Midler, Goldie Hawn and Diane Keaton, The First Wives Club followed three divorced women out to get revenge on their husbands for leaving them for younger women. Grande’s Ellen display was drawn from the scene in which the trio broke out into “You Don’t Own Me,” which was originally sung by Lesley Gore in 1963 (and more recently popularized by Grace and G-Eazy in 2015).

Midler, Hawn and Keaton’s characters did dramatic arm-swinging dance moves while dressed in all white at a wedding reception. Grande — a longtime fan of the movie — mirrored this scene, doing her own moves beside two ladies against a set complete with flowers and cake.

During the middle of the song, Hawn jumped onto a chair at the reception — and since she almost stumbled after getting down, Billboard‘s 2018 Woman of the Year did the same.

The women in both videos concluded their musical numbers by throwing on their jackets and making the same gliding strides as they walked away.

Source: billboard.com

VIDEO: Ariana Grande – breathin

On November 7th, Ariana has released the music video for her third single off of SweetenerBreathin! The music video has been directed by Hannah Lux Davis.

Check out the video and captures below!

Ariana Grande to be honoured as Billboard’s 2018 Woman of the Year

On November 6th, an article has been posted Billboard about the Women in Music event.

After an incredibly successful year and on the heels of her Billboard 200 chart-topping fourth album Sweetener, Ariana Grande has been named Billboard’s 2018 Woman of the Year.

The superstar singer, songwriter, actress and activist will be presented with the award Dec. 6 at the 13th annual Women in Music dinner and awards gala in New York. Grande joins a history of icons who have been previously honored as Woman of the Year, including Selena Gomez, Madonna, Lady Gaga and Taylor Swift.

“Ariana Grande is a star on her own terms, never bending to any particular musical trend or path in the industry,” says Ross Scarano, Billboard’s vp of content. “Certain in her convictions, she consistently stands up for herself and her decisions in a world that often isn’t hospitable to that sort of strength in young women. She’s got guts, she’s making some of the best music of her career, and she’s absolutely deserving of Woman of the Year.”

Over the course of her career, Grande has claimed the No. 1 spot on the Billboard 200 albums chart three times. Her latest chart-topper was August’s Sweetener, home to the hits “No Tears Left to Cry” and “God Is a Woman” and scoring the largest streaming week ever for a pop album by a female artist upon its release.

Beyond music, Grande uses her platform and strength to support causes she believes in. She took part in March for Our Lives earlier this year in support of smarter gun control laws and is constantly advocating for mental health awareness, gender equality, LGBTQ rights and Black Lives Matter on her social media accounts. Following the tragic Manchester Arena bombing outside her concert last year, the songstress helped organize the One Love Manchester benefit concert, which raised more than $23 million to aid victims and their families.

The Women in Music event and red-carpet pre-show will broadcast live on Dec. 6 via Twitter from 7:00 to 10 p.m. ET. Sponsors include American Airlines, Honda Stage and Nielsen Music.

Source: billboard.com

Ariana Grande announces The Sweetener World Tour with tour dates

On November 5, Ariana Grande announced tour daes for The Sweetener World Tour, which will kickoff on March 18 in Albany, New York! Check out the tour dates below!

March 18 – Albany, NY – Times Union Center
March 20 – Boston, MA – TD Garden
March 22 – Buffalo, NY – KeyBank Center
March 25 – Washington, DC – Capital One Arena
March 26 – Philadelphia, PA – Wells Fargo Center
March 28 – Cleveland, OH – Quicken Loans Arena
March 30 – Uncasville, CT – Mohegan Sun Arena
April 1 – Montreal, QC – Bell Centre
April 3 – Toronto, ON – Scotiabank Arena
April 5 – Detroit, MI – Little Caesars Arena
April 7 – Chicago, IL – United Center
April 8 – Chicago, IL – United Center
April 10 – Columbus, OH – Schottenstein Center
April 12 – Indianapolis, IN – Bankers Life Fieldhouse
April 13 – St. Louis, MO – Enterprise Center
April 15 – Milwaukee, WI – Fiserv Forum
April 17 – St. Paul, MN – Xcel Energy Center
April 18 – Omaha, NE – CHI Health Center
April 20 – Denver, CO – Pepsi Center
April 22 – Salt Lake City, UT – Vivint Smart Home Arena
April 25 – Edmonton, AB – Rogers Place
April 27 – Vancouver, BC – Rogers Arena
April 30 – Portland, OR – Moda Center
May 2 – San Jose, CA – SAP Center
May 3 – Sacramento, CA – Golden 1 Center
May 6 – Los Angeles, CA – STAPLES Center
May 7 – Los Angeles, CA – STAPLES Center
May 10 – Los Angeles, CA – The Forum
May 14 – Phoenix, AZ – Talking Stick Resort Arena
May 17 – San Antonio, TX – AT&T Center
May 19 – Houston, TX – Toyota Center
May 21 – Dallas, TX – American Airlines Center
May 23 – Oklahoma City, OK – Chesapeake Energy Arena
May 25 – New Orleans, LA – Smoothie King Center
May 28 – Tampa, FL – Amalie Arena
May 29 – Orlando, FL – Amway Center
May 31 – Miami, FL – American Airlines Arena
June 1 – Miami, FL – American Airlines Arena
June 4 – Raleigh, NC – PNC Arena
June 7 – Nashville, TN – Bridgestone Arena
June 8 – Atlanta, GA – State Farm Arena
June 10 – Charlotte, NC – Spectrum Center
June 12 – Pittsburgh, PA – PPG Paints Arena
June 14 – Brooklyn, NY – Barclays Center
June 15 – Brooklyn, NY – Barclays Center
June 18 – New York, NY – Madison Square Garden
June 19 – New York, NY – Madison Square Garden
June 21 – Washington, DC – Capital One Arena
June 22 – Boston, MA – TD Garden
June 24 – Philadelphia, PA – Wells Fargo Center
June 26 – Toronto, ON – Scotiabank Arena

Ariana Grande announces new album “thank u, next” and releases song

On November 3rd, Ariana Grande took it to Twitter to drop subtle hints about her upcoming 5th studio album, and after a few hours later, she revealed that the title of her album is called thank u, next, as she kept tweeting lyrics from the song.

Right before 11 PM EST, she surprise drops the song herself! Listen to the song below!

ITUNES | APPLE MUSIC | SPOTIFY

Ariana Grande appears on special for BBC Radio 1

On November 1, the BBC special Ariana Grande at the BBC has aired. The show was pre-recorded during the time Ariana was visiting the UK. She talked about her album Sweetener, and performed many songs from the album, as well as her hit songs from her previous albums.

Check out the photos and videos below!

On the night of that Thursday (1), a special of Ariana Grande was aired on the British TV BBC . She has performed with orchestra, including new songs from the album “Sweetener” and some classics of her career, as well as chatting with hostess Davina McCall.

In the interview, she even talked about her anxiety problems. “You have ups and downs and sometimes you spend weeks at a time when you will be raging and there will be no anxiety. Then something will happen that can trigger and you will have some bad days, “he explained.

About the sonority of the album “Sweetener”, she said: “I think it represented a change, since I do not like to hear the same thing always. I do not think I created something totally new, but for me it’s a new flavor. With that I got to know myself better, my music grew, so did fans, so everything changed together, “he explained. 
Check out the full program:

PHOTOS:

 001 ~ 118.jpg 03 ~ 31.jpg 02 ~ 43.jpg 01 ~ 69.jpg 40645308_2160913040900902_2710441957496334048_n.jpg

VIDEO:



SETLIST:
No Tears Left To Cry 
Dangerous Woman 
Breathin 
Goodnight n Go 
REM 
Only 1 
God Is a Woman 
Love Me Harder 
One Last Time

VIDEO: James Corden & Ariana Grande Visit an Escape Room

On October 30th, James Corden & Ariana’s segment on visiting an escape room has aired on The Late Late Show with James Corden. This segment was recorded on the same day they both filmed the Carpool Karaoke video.

Since Ariana Grande loves Halloween and being scared, James takes her to a haunted escape room and they both are terrified while trying to get out.

Ariana Grande performs at “A Very Wicked Halloween”

On October 29th, A Very Wicked Halloween aired on NBC, which is a special show celebrating the 15 years of the musical Wicked. She sang “The Wizard and I”, receiving praise from the audience and critics. The show was pre recorded back on October 16th. Check out the photos and watch the performance below!

Backstage

Performance

Ariana Grande & Pete Davidson officially split and call off engagement

Ariana Grande and Pete Davidson are ending things as a couple, and their engagement has officially been called off.

Sources close to the former couple tell TMZ they split this weekend, with both parties acknowledging that it simply was not the right time for their relationship to take off. “We’re told the two still have love for each other, but things are over romantically.”

Ariana and Pete announced their surprise engagement earlier this year in June — just a few weeks after they were reported to be just casually dating. Grande’s engagement ring cost right around $100k.

Grande’s recently expressed she was going through a rough patch, tweeting a lot of personal messages and saying she needs a break from the public spotlight and asking “can i pls have one okay day. just one. pls.”

As for Davidson, he’s continued to appear on SNL, even mentioning his former fiancee in a couple sketches. The last time we saw them together was just last week.

Our source says while things may be done for the couple for now, the two aren’t ruling out the possibility of anything in the future.

Source: TMZ.com