Ariana Grande makes a surprise appearance on The Late Late Show with James Corden (03/19)

On February 19th, Ariana Grande made a surprise appearance during the TNT Boys’ performance on The Late Late Show With James Corden.

After winning Filipino competition show “Your Face Sounds Familiar Kids,” band members Keifer Sanchez, Mackie Empuerto, and Francis Concepcion have continued to solidify their rising-star status with appearances on a number of television series, including CBS’ talent search show “World’s Best.”

Corden, who also hosts “World’s Best,” invited the singing trio to perform “Dreamgirls’” anthem “And I Am Telling You” on the “Late Late Show.” Before taking the stage to belt out a powerful rendition of the ballad, the group gushed about their obsession with Ariana Grande.

James Corden also surprised Ariana himself with a cake celebrating her #1 album and top 3 on the Billboard 200 and Hot 100 charts respectively. Check it out below!

Ariana Grande’s ‘thank u, next’ debuts at #1 on the Billboard 200, occupying the top 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart

Ariana Grande’s Thank U, Next storms in at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart with 360,000 equivalent album units earned in the U.S. in the week ending Feb. 14, according to Nielsen Music. The set launches with the biggest week for a pop album in over a year and garners Grande her fourth No. 1 — and second in less than six months. Of Thank U, Next’s starting unit sum, 116,000 were in album sales.

Thank U, Next, released on Feb. 8 through Republic Records, is Grande’s fourth Billboard 200 No. 1. It also launches with the biggest streaming week ever for a pop album.

The Billboard 200 chart ranks the most popular albums of the week in the U.S. based on multi-metric consumption as measured in equivalent album units. Units are comprised of traditional album sales, track equivalent albums (TEA) and streaming equivalent albums (SEA). The new Feb. 23-dated chart (where Thank U, Next debuts at No. 1) will be posted in full on Billboard‘s websites on Wednesday, Feb. 20 (a day later than usual, owed to the U.S. Washington’s birthday holiday, often referred to as Presidents’ Day, on Feb. 18).

Grande’s Fourth No. 1 Album: It follows Sweetener (which debuted atop the list dated Sept. 1, 2018), My Everything (Sept. 13, 2014) and Yours Truly (Sept. 21, 2013). Grande ties Taylor Swift for the second-most No. 1s among women this decade, trailing Lady Gaga, with five leaders since 2010.

Two No. 1s in Less Than Six Months: Thank U, Next opens at No. 1 less than six months after Grande last topped the chart, with Sweetener, on the Sept. 1, 2018-dated chart. That span of five months and 22 days is the shortest gap between new No. 1s on the Billboard 200 for a woman since 1974-75, when Olivia Newton-John waited just five months and three days between the first weeks at No. 1 for If You Love Me Let Me Know (Oct. 12, 1974) and Have You Never Been Mellow (March 15, 1975). Both titles spent one week at No. 1.

Grande’s accumulation of her two latest No. 1s is the fastest since K-pop group BTS notched its first two No. 1s in a little over three months just last year (Love Yourself: Tear on June 2, 2018 and Love Yourself: Answer on Sept. 8, 2018). In 2017, rapper Future nabbed an unprecedented pair of back-to-back new No. 1s in successive weeks (with his self-titled album March 11 and HNDRXX on March 18).

Biggest Week for a Pop Album in Over a Year: As Thank U, Next starts with 360,000 units, the set earns the biggest week for a pop album in over a year. The last pop set to tally a larger week was Swift’s Reputation, which began at No. 1 on the chart dated Dec. 2, 2017 with 1.24 million units earned. Thank U, Next also scores the biggest week for an album by a woman since reputation.

Thank U, Next has the largest week of any album since Oct. 13, 2018, when Lil Wayne’s Tha Carter V bowed at No. 1 with 480,000 units.

Largest Streaming Week for a Pop Album & Any Album by a Woman: Of Thank U, Next’s starting unit sum of 360,000 units, 228,000 are in SEA units. That latter sum translates to a whopping 307 million on-demand audio streams for the album’s songs during the tracking week. That’s a remarkable sum considering most-heavily-streamed albums are hip-hop sets. (Of the top 20 largest-streaming weeks ever for an album, Thank U, Next is the only non-hip-hop title.)

Thank U, Next easily sets the record for the largest streaming week for a pop album (beating the debut frame of Ed Sheeran’s ÷ [Divide] with 126.7 million on-demand audio streams for its songs; March 25, 2017) and the biggest streaming week for an album by a woman (surpassing the debut week of Cardi B’s Invasion of Privacy with 202.6 million; April 21, 2018).

Thank U, Next has the ninth-largest streaming week for an album overall, and the eighth-biggest debut week. Drake’s Scorpion remains the streaming record-holder among all albums, with 745.9 million on-demand audio streams registered for its songs in its debut week (July 14, 2018). (Scorpion actually has two of the top nine biggest weeks, as the album’s second-week streaming sum is the fourth-largest overall, with 391 million.).

Source: billboard.com


Ariana Grande becomes the first artist to hold the Nos. 1, 2 and 3 spots on the Billboard Hot 100 songs chart simultaneously since The Beatles in 1964, as her new album Thank U, Next launches at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums tally.

Grande’s “7 Rings” rules the Hot 100 (dated Feb. 23) for a fourth week, while “Break Up With Your Girlfriend, I’m Bored” debuts at No. 2 and former seven-week leader “Thank U, Next” rebounds from No. 7 to No. 3. All three songs are from the Thank U, Next album, released on Republic Records.

Grande is just the second act in the Hot 100’s 60-year history to monopolize the top three in a week. The Beatles earned the honor for five weeks in March and April 1964, even claiming the entire top five on the April 4, 1964-dated chart.

“7 Rings” No. 1 again: Grande’s “7 Rings” spends a fourth week atop the Hot 100, encompassing its entire run on the chart. “Rings” leads the Streaming Songs chart for a fourth frame, with 63.5 million U.S. streams, up 10 percent, in the week ending Feb. 14, according to Nielsen Music. On Radio Songs, “Rings” rises 10-9, up 23 percent to 61.7 million audience impressions in the week ending Feb. 17, good for the Hot 100’s top Airplay Gainer award for a third week.

“Break Up” bows at No. 2: New Thank U, Next single “Break Up With Your Girlfriend, I’m Bored” blasts onto the Hot 100 at No. 2 (marking Grande’s 13th top 10). It launches at No. 2 on both Streaming Songs (59.2 million) and Digital Song Sales (36,000 sold), while drawing 13.4 million airplay impressions.

“Next” up, at No. 3: Meanwhile, the Thank U, Next title track and lead single rebounds 7-3 on the Hot 100, after spending seven weeks at No. 1, beginning with its Nov. 17 debut at the summit. It’s powered most heavily by its 36.8 million U.S. streams, up 52 percent, as it surges 14-5 on Streaming Songs and claims the Hot 100’s top Streaming Gainer nod.

Ariana meets The Beatles: Grande is only the second act in the Hot 100’s history to rank at Nos. 1, 2 and 3 simultaneously and the first in nearly 55 years. The Beatles achieved the feat for five weeks in 1964, that March 14, 21 and 28 and April 4 and 25; on April 4, 1964, the group claimed the entire top five.

“7 Rings,” “Break Up” and “Next” mark the first triple-up for an artist at Nos. 1, 2 and 3 on the Hot 100 since The Beatles held the same spots on April 25, 1964, with “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “Twist and Shout” and “Do You Want to Know a Secret,” respectively. (Thus, the last time the honor was earned, the No. 1 song was about how “I don’t care too much for money; money can’t buy me love”; “7 Rings” finds Grande declaring “retail therapy my new addiction.”)

Pop’s resurgence: Meanwhile, Grande has been at the forefront of a turnaround for pop songs’ fortunes atop the Hot 100. On Sept. 22, 2018, Drake’s “In My Feelings” spent its 10th and final week at No. 1, wrapping a record 34-week streak of rap leaders (29 by Drake). Since then, pop songs have led for 20 of 22 weeks, thanks to Maroon 5’s “Girls Like You,” featuring Cardi B (seven weeks at No. 1); Grande’s “Next” (seven); Halsey’s “Without Me” (two); and Grande’s “7 Rings” (four).

In that 22-week span, two rap titles each spent a week at No. 1: Travis Scott’s “Sicko Mode” and Post Malone and Swae Lee’s “Sunflower (Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse).”

Women at No. 1 in 2019: Plus, women have now spent seven weeks at No. 1 on the Hot 100 on charts dated 2019, starting with the seventh and last week on top on for Grande’s “Next” on the chart dated Jan. 5 (followed by two weeks in charge for “Without Me” and four for “7 Rings”). Thus, as of late February, women in lead roles have almost matched last year’s total time atop the Hot 100, as women as credited leads tallied eight weeks at No. 1 in all of 2018 (including the first six weeks on top for “Next”; Camila Cabello and Cardi B also ruled for a week each as leads in 2018).

Source: billboard.com

Ariana Grande’s ‘7 rings’ debuts at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100

Ariana Grande’s “7 Rings” shines atop the Billboard Hot 100, blasting in at No. 1 on the chart dated Feb. 2.

The song is Grande’s second Hot 100 No. 1 and second to start on top, following “Thank U, Next,” which debuted atop the chart dated Nov. 17, and led for seven total weeks.

“Rings,” released on Republic Records, arrives as the 1,083rd No. 1 in the Hot 100’s 60-year history, and launches as the week’s most-streamed and top-selling song.

Following the Jan. 18 premiere of the song and its official video, “Rings” debuts at No. 1 on the Streaming Songs chart with 85.3 million U.S. streams in the week ending Jan. 24, according to Nielsen Music. The sum marks the second-biggest streaming week ever for a song by a female artist, after Grande’s own “Next,” which drew 93.8 million, as reflected on the chart dated Dec. 15, following the premiere of its official video. (Drake’s “In My Feelings” holds the overall record: 116.1 million; July 28.) Grande earns her second Streaming Songs No. 1, after “Next.”

“Rings” also roars in at No. 1 on Digital Song Sales, with 96,000 downloads sold in the week ending Jan. 24. Grande adds her fifth No. 1 on the survey. The total is the best for a song in six months, since Drake’s “Feelings” sold 104,000 (Aug. 4), and the best for a female artist since Grande’s “No Tears Left to Cry” (100,000; May 5). (“Next” hit a weekly high of 81,000 in its debut week.)

“Rings” additionally arrives at No. 39 on Radio Songs, with 27.5 million audience impressions in its first full tracking week (ending Jan. 27).

The song is the radio follow-up to “Next,” and follows the track “Imagine,” which debuted and peaked at No. 24 on the Hot 100 (Dec. 29). All three songs are from Grande’s forthcoming album, Thank U, Next, the follow-up to Sweetener, which bowed as her third Billboard 200 No. 1 in September.

Let’s ring up more facts about Grande’s new No. 1:

Grande entrance: “Rings” is the 33rd single to debut at No. 1 on the Hot 100, while Grande becomes just the fifth artist with multiple No. 1 starts, joining Mariah Carey, the leader with three, Justin Bieber, Drake and Britney Spears (two each).

In the Hot 100’s history, Grande is the first artist whose first two No. 1s have both debuted at the pinnacle.

(Before “Next” and “Rings,” no female artist had entered atop the Hot 100 since Adele with “Hello” in November 2015; seven songs then started at No. 1 until “Next.”)

Back at 1: Grande collects her second Hot 100 No. 1 just two months and two weeks after “Next” opened on top. That’s the quickest accumulation of leaders for an artist (in a lead role) since Justin Bieber’s “Love Yourself” hit No. 1 only three weeks after “Sorry” first reached No. 1 in early 2016. Among women, Grande lands the fastest succession of new No. 1s since Rihanna’s “What’s My Name?,” featuring Drake, hit the top spot on Nov. 20, 2010, and “Only Girl (In the World)” followed just two weeks later (Dec. 4).

‘Sound of’ No. 1: “Rings” channels the melody of The Sound of Music‘s “My Favorite Things,” and sports writing credits for the classic song’s iconic composers, the late Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. Along with Sound, the pair created beloved Broadway musicals including The King and IOklahoma! and South Pacific.

One version of “My Favorite Things” has charted on the Hot 100: by Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass, a No. 45 hit in January 1969.

‘7’ @ 1: The numeral 7 appears in a Hot 100 No. 1 for the second time, after (technically) Elton John’s “Candle in the Wind 1997″/”Something About the Way You Look Tonight” (14 weeks at No. 1, 1997-98). As for songs featuring “7” with no accompanying numbers in their titles, Grande’s one-ups the previous top-peaking such hit, Lukas Graham’s “7 Years,” which reached No. 2 in April 2016.

Notably, “7” by Prince and The New Power Generation peaked at (where else?) No. 7 in 1993.

Lords of the ‘Ring’s: Plus, Grande tallies the fourth Hot 100 No. 1 with “ring” in its title. It follows Beyoncé’s “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)” (four weeks at No. 1, 2008-09); Anita Ward’s “Ring My Bell” (two, 1979); and Gary Lewis and The Playboys’ “This Diamond Ring” (two, 1965).

Source: billboard.com

Ariana Grande’s Billboard Woman of the Year cover story

On December 5th, Ariana’s cover story for Billboard’s Woman In Music has been posted!


Ariana Grande is milly rocking in her seat behind the massive mixing console at Los Angeles’ Record Plant studio, a wide grin revealing the single dimple in her left cheek. Her new single, “Thank U, Next,” will not officially become her first Billboard Hot 100 No. 1 for another three days, but its explosive success is already making headlines. For Grande, the milestone is especially meaningful. It’s the exact kind of music she has wanted to make all along.

“It’s a Tommy Brown single!” she exclaims, hitting the arm of her chair for emphasis. Brown, a producer and songwriter, has been working with Grande since her 2013 debut, Yours Truly, and Grande is positively giddy at the prospect of their shared musical breakthrough. “I can’t believe it but, like, so can. It’s me and my besties tipsy off champagne — and me with a broken heart — just letting it out and having fun. I love this more than any other song I’ve ever put out.”

That kind of joy has been tough to come by in the past few months for Billboard’s Woman Of The Year, despite the fact that she has never had more career momentum. Grande’s fourth album, Sweetener, became her third No. 1 on the Billboard 200 in August, breaking streaming records while earning critical acclaim. So far it has produced two top 10 singles on the Hot 100, with a third, “Breathin,” now at No. 13. But while she was in the middle of promoting the project, her dear friend, collaborator and ex-boyfriend Mac Miller died from an accidental overdose. Just over a month later, her whirlwind engagement to comedian Pete Davidson ended.

On this November afternoon, it’s still too soon for Grande to talk about what has happened in anything other than broad strokes. “I’m really lucky and really unlucky at the same time,” says the 25-year-old.

To sing about it, though, is another story. Not long after Miller’s death, Grande started spending all of her time with her closest friends and collaborators, including Brown, recording a new album (which she says will also be called Thank U, Next) at a studio across the street from her New York apartment. Though she has been in therapy since she was just a kid coping with her parents’ divorce — and is quick to espouse its benefits — right now the most healing comes when she’s standing behind a mic.

“When I felt myself saying, ‘’Cause her name is Ari,’ I knew it was a special line, but part of me was like, ‘Oh, my God, that’s kind of corny,’” says Grande, referring to the “Thank U, Next” lyric, a declaration of self-love. She tucks her bare legs inside a light-blue hoodie that reads “Beau Souci” (French for “beautiful worry”) and wraps her arms around them. “But the other part of me was like, ‘That’s beautiful and I need to keep it in.’ I know that once I put something into a song, then it’s real.”

Fittingly, the control room is decked out like a refuge: a small bouquet of white flowers, a single candle, a light projecting water ripples onto the ceiling. Grande, sporting an extension-less version of her signature ponytail, sips from a Starbucks iced soy latte while animatedly chatting about the music she has been working on — the only thing she’s really interested in discussing, the only thing that matters to her right now. As it turns out, a series of tragedies has given the star two unexpected gifts: the freedom to channel her hurt into the most raw and untempered music of her career, and the audacity to buck the pop music establishment — which, as Grande will note more quickly than anyone, is particularly entrenched when it comes to women.

She had the talent: the four-octave range and effortless vocal agility that led Gloria Estefan, after hearing the 8-year-old Grande sing “My Heart Will Go On” at a cruise-ship karaoke night, to tell her she was gifted. She had the support system: her close-knit family, familiar to anyone who follows the singer on social media. And she had the work ethic, performing in public regularly before the age of 10 and on Broadway by age 15. “When I was 6 years old, I just kind of decided that’s what I’m going to do with my life, period,” says Grande, who grew up in Boca Raton, Fla. “I manifested it. I knew I would. There was never really a doubt in my mind.”

The singer proceeded to do all she could to reach superstardom, and logged time in the teeny-bopper trenches at Nickelodeon. In 2011, she signed with Republic Records; not long after, she met Mac Miller. He was 20 and she was 19, so naturally they first talked on Twitter. The pair became fast friends, and she invited him to do a verse on her first album’s lead single, 2013’s bouncy ’90s throwback “The Way.” Grande told Billboard at the time that Miller was giving her Pro Tools pointers as they recorded. She added, “If you want to motivate Mac Miller to do anything, just bake cookies.”

Now, she looks back on the song as the first time she really captured her own musical style, what she had been searching for while growing up idolizing India.Arie. “When we made ‘The Way,’ I was like, ‘Oh, wow, I’m onto something here,’” says Grande. Her face dims slightly; just before this interview, she was working on a new song, which, when she plays it for me later, I realize is about Miller. “It felt like, ‘I should do this forever.’”

“The Way” reached No. 9 on the Hot 100, and like the rest of her debut, it holds up remarkably well. Babyface, one of the album’s producers, helped legitimize Grande’s long-held R&B aspirations. Nevertheless, when she released Yours Truly, Grande was still viewed as a preteen idol, thanks to her history on kiddie TV and diminutive size (she’s exactly 5 feet tall). So on her next two albums, she went even bigger, employing Max Martin and pursuing the kinds of pop hits that would make her undeniable to any listener.

“We started at home base — me,” Grande says of Yours Truly, “and then we went in this place where I kind of played the game for a little bit, and did the big, big, big pop records. Then we slowly started incorporating my soul back into it — and that’s where we’ve landed again with ‘Thank U, Next.’”

Grande has put in the work, done everything that was asked of her — all the tiny compromises that went along with playing the game — and kept her nose clean (with the exception of a little doughnut glaze, which she erased from the public’s memory with a cleverly self-deprecating sketch on one of the best Saturday Night Live hosting debuts in recent memory). She has hit songs and high Pitchfork ratings, to say nothing of her devoted fans, the Arianators. Grande’s late-night TV appearances — routine promotional stops for most stars — are events, thanks to her natural sense of comic timing and gift for impressions both sung and spoken (Google her doing Jennifer Coolidge). She followed all the rules, and arrived at what seemed like the top.

The singer has no regrets. “I got myself to a place where I would be able to do things like drop a surprise record and have it be the biggest single I’ve ever had,” she says now. But five years into her career, she hadn’t yet had a No. 1 Hot 100 song, and hadn’t found the ubiquity that she knew deep down she deserved.

Then, on May 22, 2017, a suicide bomber killed 23 people and injured 139 outside the arena in Manchester, England, where Grande had just finished performing as part of her Dangerous Woman Tour. Many of the victims were children.

Within weeks Grande was back, not just onstage but in Manchester, visiting survivors in the hospital and hosting the One Love Manchester benefit, which helped raise 23 million pounds (about $29 million) for the victims. She released her live rendition of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” from the benefit, during which she broke down in tears — though she still finished the performance — and donated the proceeds to the Red Cross. “Our response to this violence must be to come closer together, to help each other, to love more, to sing louder and to live more kindly and generously than we did before,” she wrote at the time.

She did exactly that with the album that followed, this summer’s Sweetener, an optimistic paean to her own healing; there was no dwelling on tragedy, only gentleness and positivity. The first single was titled “No Tears Left to Cry,” and the album concluded with the tender “Get Well Soon,” a five-minute, 22-second tribute to the Manchester victims. Meanwhile, she had found new contentment outside the studio with SNL star Davidson, in a relationship that she happily flaunted despite the tabloid frenzy that enveloped them both.

In a tweet a month ago, Grande summed up her feelings on what has happened since: “Remember when i was like hey i have no tears left to cry and the universe was like HAAAAAAAAA bitch u thought.”

This afternoon, Grande is often near tears, a fact she readily acknowledges. “I just hope you’re OK with me crying, because that’s not going to not happen,” she says, laughing even as she’s tearing up in the midst of talking about how she has coped with so much tragedy in such a short span of time. “I can’t even say ‘Good morning’ to anyone without crying.” The blessing, for both the singer and her fans, is the music. “I guess there’s not much I’m afraid of anymore,” she says, her normally silky voice tightening. “When life tries you with such serious shit so many times, your priorities change. I don’t give a shit. I just want to be happy and healthy — one day — and make music.”

Where she’s currently sitting — behind the mixing console — is just about the only place Grande feels like she has control. And she is, in her own words, a control freak. Though she won’t say that she has perfect pitch (“People tell me I do, but I’m not going to sit here and be like, ‘Yes, I do’”), when talking about her music, Grande betrays a craftsman’s obsession with arrangements and vocal harmonies. “I’ll hear something that’s on one track out of, like, a thousand in a session and be emailing the engineer about it,” she says. Martin and Pharrell Williams both let her “steer,” which is one of the reasons she has worked with them repeatedly. But not every man she has shared a studio with has been as willing to cede the reins.

“I’ve politely walked out of sessions before,” says Grande. “It has happened. I’m a small girl. People tend to underestimate that. And then I sit down and comp my own vocals and can produce my own session, and they’re like” — here she adopts an excellent impersonation of a dopey man — “‘Oh, I didn’t know you could do that.’ I’m like, ‘Believe it or not, there are plenty of tiny women that can do this.’” This is the Grande who digs for deep cuts, covering songs by eclectic bassist Thundercat and exchanging Instagram DMs with legendary jazz trumpeter Arturo Sandoval (the pair did a track together alongside Williams).

This is also the Grande who has been vocal about fighting sexism. Her recent single “God Is a Woman” might be the most obvious example, but even in 2015, in a Notes app manifesto that quoted Gloria Steinem, she was critiquing the media’s habit of defining famous women by their relationship status.

“I would just love to see a chart with as many women on top as men,” she says. “It’s just so male-dominated. It’s so easy for them. There are so many unbelievable female artists out there that try so much harder.”

Despite the industry barriers Grande is breaking down — she’s the only artist ever to have the lead single from each of her first four albums debut in the top 10 of the Hot 100, and the first woman in three years to have a single debut at No. 1 on the Hot 100 — she sometimes feels like she’s still pushing against an audience that wants her to fit into specific stereotypes. “They’re unable to accept the fact that women are a million things, and not just two,” she says. “You can be adorable and brilliant. You can be friendly and silly, and yet strong and indestructible. You can be professional and present and also sexual and fun.

“My dream has always been to be — obviously not a rapper, but, like, to put out music in the way that a rapper does. I feel like there are certain standards that pop women are held to that men aren’t. We have to do the teaser before the single, then do the single, and wait to do the preorder, and radio has to impact before the video, and we have to do the discount on this day, and all this shit. It’s just like, ‘Bruh, I just want to fucking talk to my fans and sing and write music and drop it the way these boys do. Why do they get to make records like that and I don’t?’ So I do and I did and I am, and I will continue to.” Grande pauses briefly, growing serious.

“And if it doesn’t work out the way ‘Thank U, Next’ did, that’s fine too! It is so exciting to see something be received well. That’s a beautiful thing. But it’s even more beautiful to be honest and just do something.” She sniffs, her eyes dampening. “To drop a record on a Saturday night because you feel like it, and because your heart’s going to explode if you don’t — to take back your narrative.”

Grande starts to cry in earnest, carefully wiping away tears so as not to smudge her winged eyeliner. “I don’t want to do what people tell me to do, I don’t want to conform to the pop star agenda. I want to do it on my own terms from now on. If I want to tour two albums at once, I’m going to tour two albums at once. If I want to drop a third album while I’m on tour [in 2019], I’ll do that too! Please. [“Thank U, Next” production duo] Social House is my opening act — you don’t think we’re going to have a studio on the bus? That we’re not going to be making records on the road? Of course we are. I want to be able to do what is authentic and honest and natural. It’s the only way that I’ve been able to survive.” She puts her face in her hands, resting her fingertips — adorned with perfectly manicured white oval nails — on her forehead.

Talking explicitly about the men in Grande’s life is a non-starter. She still loves all her songs, even “Pete Davidson.” (She also sent the Davidson in question “Thank U, Next” before releasing it: “I wasn’t going to blindside anybody,” she says.) The wound left by Miller’s death is, unsurprisingly, still raw. She expects Thanksgiving will be particularly hard, since she had spent the past few holidays in Pittsburgh with Miller’s family. At this point, these are the kinds of details that Grande already knows will be A1 on every gossip site. Her rise to fame has been punctuated by a series of public romances, which she writes off as a side effect of her workaholism. “This is how I meet people — I can’t just, like, meet someone at a bar,” she says. “I live fast and full-out, and I make mistakes, and I learn from them and I’m grateful no matter what happens.”

Grande has no plans to take a break, despite the fact that she has been working more or less constantly since the beginning of her career. When we meet, in early November, she’s in the midst of finishing Thank U, Next; prepping the video for the single; and preparing for her Sweetener World Tour, which starts in March 2019. “I feel like I’ve only scratched the surface of the artist I can be, and I just want to keep growing and practicing and getting better,” she says. “I never want to get lazy.”

The new album is Grande’s therapy and her catharsis. She invites her friends and collaborators — Brown, Social House, Victoria Monét, Tayla Parx and Doug Middlebrook — back into the control room to listen to it. Brown pops a bottle of pink Veuve Clicquot. “I don’t think I’ve ever consumed more alcohol than I have in the past month,” jokes Grande, cheered by their presence. “I am champagne. You know how people say we’re 60 percent water? I’m 60 percent pink Veuve Clicquot.”

Thank U, Next was mostly written in a week, with the people she’s toasting in the control room, and recorded in two weeks. Now comes the polishing phase and the addition of some tracks with Martin and his team. It was the product of a lot of “feminine energy and champagne and music and laughter and crying. This [album’s] not particularly uplifting,” she says. “A lot of it sounds really upbeat, but it’s actually a super sad chapter.”

The music is defiant — deep, bass-driven bangers with trap beats alternating with airy, sad ballads — and aesthetically more adventurous than anything she has ever released. Some of the lyrics are so unambiguously personal and gutting that even if the singer were up for talking about them, most questions would be redundant. But one of the more upbeat tunes, “7 Rings,” has a backstory Grande is happy to discuss.

“It was a… challenging fall day in New York,” she begins, cracking up. “Me and my friends went to Tiffany’s together, just because we needed some retail therapy. You know how when you’re waiting at Tiffany’s they give you lots of champagne? They got us very tipsy, so we bought seven engagement rings, and when I got back to the studio I gave everybody a friendship ring.” She flashes a diamond ring on her right hand; Monét and Parx are wearing them as well. “That’s why we have these, and that’s where the song idea came from.”

She goes to her phone and presses “play,” and a party-ready twist on “My Favorite Things” booms out of the speakers. Grande whispers some asides to her friends, who are bopping along to the song. Then she starts to dance around the room in her bare feet, alone and smiling.
WOMEN MAKE IT WORK
Behind the scenes of Grande’s success.

Donna Gryn
Senior vp marketing, Republic Records

My role: I’ve worked with Ariana since we launched “The Way” in 2013, overseeing marketing campaigns and working closely with her, management and Republic on every aspect of music strategy and rollout.

On Ariana: You might not know how involved she really is with everything we do. She really leads the charge in a way most artists don’t, and it’s one of the reasons she is so successful. Also worth mentioning: She often has us laughing out loud.

Rachel Bisdee
Senior director of international marketing, Republic Records

My role: The international team works with Scooter Braun Projects and Universal Music labels globally to create marketing campaigns and promotional strategy outside the United States, including Ariana’s TV, radio and awards show performances.

On Ariana: During an off-day in Australia, she rented a sightseeing bus for us. She took the mic and became our Broadway-musical-style tour guide and delivered sidesplitting commentary.

Jennifer McDaniels
GM, SB Projects

My role: I oversee all music ventures.

On Ariana: She did a series of Sweetener shows [in July], during which I got to see her interact with her fans on an intimate level. She remembered faces and names of fans that had been to other events, took requests and truly made them all feel special.

Jules Ferree
Head of brand partnerships, SB Projects

My role: With the support of the Scooter Braun Projects team, I work to cultivate, secure and manage Ariana’s various brand partnerships.

On Ariana: The second night of The Sweetener Sessions with AMEX in Chicago, she had finished performing the hourlong planned setlist, but continued the show a cappella for another 45 minutes, just to keep the love in the room flowing with her fans.

Source: billboard.com

Ariana Grande earns first #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart with “thank u, next”

On November 12th, it was announced that Ariana Grande scores her first No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 (dated Nov. 17), as “Thank U, Next” rockets onto the chart at No. 1, arriving as the top-streamed and top-selling song of the week.

The track dethrones Maroon 5’s “Girls Like You,” featuring Cardi B, after seven weeks on top, although the collaboration ties for the second-most weeks spent at No. 1 in the history of the Radio Songs chart.

Grande’s First Hot 100 No. 1: “Next,” released on Republic Records, is Grande’s first Hot 100 No. 1, and the 1,079th in the chart’s 60-year history. She previously hit a No. 2 high with “Problem,” featuring Iggy Azalea, in 2014. “Next” also bows as her 11th Hot 100 top 10 and first since “God Is a Woman,” which reached No. 8 in September.

Grande reigns at last with her 35th Hot 100 entry. Among Hot 100 chart-topping acts, she ends the longest wait for her first No. 1 (by total chart appearances from a first entry) since Justin Bieber set the mark by earning his first leader with his 47th charted title, “What Do You Mean?,” in 2015.

Grande first hit the Hot 100 (debuting at No. 10) on April 13, 2013, with the eventual No. 9-peaking “The Way,” featuring Mac Miller.

No. 1 in Streams & Sales: “Next” launches with 55.5 million U.S. streams and 81,000 downloads sold in the week ending Nov. 8, according to Nielsen Music. Notably, the song debuts on the Hot 100 with just over five days of streaming and sales data, as it was released late Saturday, Nov. 3 (as the tracking week for those metrics runs Friday through Thursday). Grande has released two videos for the song so far: an audio clip upon its release and a lyric video Nov. 6.

With “Next,” Grande likewise earns her first No. 1 on the Streaming Songs chart and her fourth leader on Digital Song Sales, after “Problem,” for three weeks in 2014; “Bang Bang,” with Jessie J and Nicki Minaj (one week, 2014); and “No Tears Left to Cry” (one, this May).

“Next” also drew 11.3 million in all-format radio audience in the week ending Nov. 11.

“God Is a Woman” and “No Tears” are from Grande’s third Billboard 200 No. 1 album, Sweetener, which debuted atop the list dated Sept. 1, while “Next” is, as of now, a stand-alone track, with the song’s lyrics referencing past relationships with, among others, Big Sean, ex-finance Pete Davidson and the late Miller.

Meme-orable: As for its lyrics, aiding the buzz of “Next” are, specifically, its lines, “One taught me love / One taught me patience / One taught me pain,” which have sparked an onslaught of memes.

New at No. 1: “Next” is the 32nd single to debut at No. 1 on the Hot 100 and the first by a female artist in three years, since Adele’s “Hello” on the chart dated Nov. 14, 2015.

As noticed by chart-watcher Jake Rivera, “Next” is the fourth No. 1 debut of 2018, tying the record established in 1995, the first year that any single soared in at the summit. “Next” follows prior 2018 No. 1 bows for Childish Gambino’s “This Is America” (May 19) and Drake’s “Nice for What” (April 21) and “God’s Plan” (Feb. 3). The four No. 1 entrances in 1995: Michael Jackson’s “You Are Not Alone,” Mariah Carey’s “Fantasy,” Whitney Houston’s “Exhale (Shoop Shoop)” and Carey and Boyz II Men’s “One Sweet Day.”

Pop on top, again: As “Next” follows Maroon 5’s “Girls,” featuring Cardi B, at No. 1, two pop songs have led the Hot 100 in succession for the first time since Jan. 27, when Camila Cabello’s “Havana,” featuring Young Thug, replaced Ed Sheeran’s “Perfect.” “Next” also ends a record streak of 42 weeks of No. 1s with at least one credited rapper, from Young Thug (on “Havana”) to Cardi B (“Girls” and “I Like It,” with Bad Bunny and J Balvin). The run also included Drake (“Plan,” “Nice” and “In My Feelings”); Childish Gambino (“America”); Post Malone and Ty Dolla $ign (“Psycho”); and, XXXTentacion (“Sad!”).

As “Girls” drops to No. 2, pop songs rank at Nos. 1 and 2 on the Hot 100 in the same week for the first time since Jan. 27 (“Havana” and “Perfect,” respectively).

No. 1 is a woman: Grande is the first female soloist to top the Hot 100 unaccompanied by another act since Cardi B on Oct. 21, 2017, when her debut hit “Bodak Yellow (Money Moves)” spent its third and final week at No. 1.

Solo women in lead roles have led the Hot 100 for just three weeks (of 46 total so far) in 2018, thanks to “Next,” “I Like It” and “Havana.” That follows totals of six weeks in 2017 (via two No. 1s); 16 in 2016 (three No. 1s); 10 in 2015 (four No. 1s); 28 in 2014 (five No. 1s); and, 17 in 2013 (four No. 1s).

The last year in which lead solo women logged as few as three weeks at No. 1 on the Hot 100? 1975, thanks to one each for Linda Ronstadt (“You’re No Good”), Olivia Newton-John (“Have You Never Been Mellow”) and Minnie Riperton (“Lovin’ You”). (After the Hot 100’s Aug. 4, 1958, inception, no lead solo women reigned until June 27, 1960, when Connie Francis spent her first of two weeks on top with “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool.”)

‘Thank’s for the memories: Grande is thankful for the fourth Hot 100 No. 1 that includes “thank” in its title, following “Thank God I Found You,” by Carey featuring Joe and 98 Degrees (2000), “Thank God I’m a Country Boy,” by John Denver (1975), and “Thank You Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin”/”Everybody Is a Star,” by Sly & The Family Stone (1970).

(Grande’s new No. 1 also takes over as the highest-charting Hot 100 hit to begin with “Thank U”; Alanis Morissette’s “Thank U” reached No. 17 in 1998. The only other such title? “Thank U Very Much” by The Scaffold, a No. 69 hit in 1968. You’re welcome for that trivia …)

More Grande: Beyond the Hot 100’s top 10, Grande’s “Woman” holds at No. 20 and fellow Sweetener single “Breathin” charges 32-21, passing its prior No. 22 peak; following the Nov. 7 premiere of its official video, “Breathin” bounds by 64 percent to 12.2 million streams by 118 percent to 12,000 sold in the week ending Nov. 8 and claims the Hot 100’s top Streaming and Sales Gainer awards.

“Next” easily outperformed Maroon 5’s “Girls” in the tracking week, as the latter drops to No. 2 on the Hot 100 after seven weeks at No. 1. Still, “Girls” leads Radio Songs for a 16th week, with 109.3 million in audience (down 4 percent), tying for the second-longest No. 1 run in the chart’s 28-year history. “Girls” matches the longest Radio Songs reign this century, equaling Carey’s 16-week command with “We Belong Together” in 2005.

Source: billboard.com

Ariana Grande to be honoured as Billboard’s 2018 Woman of the Year

On November 6th, an article has been posted Billboard about the Women in Music event.

After an incredibly successful year and on the heels of her Billboard 200 chart-topping fourth album Sweetener, Ariana Grande has been named Billboard’s 2018 Woman of the Year.

The superstar singer, songwriter, actress and activist will be presented with the award Dec. 6 at the 13th annual Women in Music dinner and awards gala in New York. Grande joins a history of icons who have been previously honored as Woman of the Year, including Selena Gomez, Madonna, Lady Gaga and Taylor Swift.

“Ariana Grande is a star on her own terms, never bending to any particular musical trend or path in the industry,” says Ross Scarano, Billboard’s vp of content. “Certain in her convictions, she consistently stands up for herself and her decisions in a world that often isn’t hospitable to that sort of strength in young women. She’s got guts, she’s making some of the best music of her career, and she’s absolutely deserving of Woman of the Year.”

Over the course of her career, Grande has claimed the No. 1 spot on the Billboard 200 albums chart three times. Her latest chart-topper was August’s Sweetener, home to the hits “No Tears Left to Cry” and “God Is a Woman” and scoring the largest streaming week ever for a pop album by a female artist upon its release.

Beyond music, Grande uses her platform and strength to support causes she believes in. She took part in March for Our Lives earlier this year in support of smarter gun control laws and is constantly advocating for mental health awareness, gender equality, LGBTQ rights and Black Lives Matter on her social media accounts. Following the tragic Manchester Arena bombing outside her concert last year, the songstress helped organize the One Love Manchester benefit concert, which raised more than $23 million to aid victims and their families.

The Women in Music event and red-carpet pre-show will broadcast live on Dec. 6 via Twitter from 7:00 to 10 p.m. ET. Sponsors include American Airlines, Honda Stage and Nielsen Music.

Source: billboard.com

Ariana Grande’s ‘Sweetener’ debuts at #1 on the Billboard 200

The Billboard 200 chart ranks the most popular albums of the week in the U.S. based on multi-metric consumption as measured in equivalent album units. Units are comprised of traditional album sales, track equivalent albums (TEA) and streaming equivalent albums (SEA). The new Sept. 1-dated chart (where Sweetener launches at No. 1) will be posted in full on Billboard‘s websites on Tuesday, Aug. 28.

Grande’s Third No. 1: Sweetener is Grande’s third leader on the Billboard 200, following the chart-topping debuts of her second album, My Everything (Sept. 13, 2014), and her debut effort, Yours Truly (Sept. 21, 2013). Of her four full-length studio sets, only her third release, Dangerous Woman, missed the top. It debuted and peaked at No. 2 on June 11, 2016 (stuck behind Grande’s labelmate, Drake, with his blockbuster album Views, which was in its fourth of 14 nonconsecutive weeks at No. 1).

‘Sweetener’ Surpasses ‘Dangerous’: With Sweetener’s start of 231,000 units, it beats the bow of Grande’s last album, Dangerous Woman. The latter entered the chart at No. 2 with 175,000 units.

Second Biggest Week of 2018 for a Woman: Sweetener secures the second-largest week for an album by a woman in 2018. Only Cardi B’s Invasion of Privacy launched with a larger figure: 255,000 units (No. 1, April 21-dated chart). Thus, Sweetener also has the biggest week for a pop album by a woman. Speaking of pop albums by women…

Largest Streaming Week Ever for a Pop Album by a Woman: Sweetener’s songs collected 126.7 million on-demand audio streams in its debut frame — the largest streaming week for a pop album by a woman. It’s also the biggest streaming week for any non-hip-hop effort by a womanSweetener is the rare pop album that performed strongly on streaming services — generally rap albums post big streaming numbers in comparison to other genres.

Source: Billboard.com

Ariana Grande performs at the 2018 Billboard Music Awards

On May 20th, Ariana Grande performed at the 2018 Billboard Music Awards, where she sang No Tears Left To Cry!  After her performance, titles saying “The Light Is Coming” appear on screen, hinting at the song to be released! Check out photos and videos below!

Performance

Backstage/Audience

Ariana Grande listed in Billboard’s 2017 Year End Charts

On December 11th, Billboard published their 2017 Year End Charts, which are a cumulative measure of a single or album’s performance in the United States during the year. Ariana has been listed in many charts despite releasing any music and has become the Female Artist of the YearCheck out where she has been ranked in!

VOTE: Ariana Grande is nominated at the 2017 Billboard Music Awards

On April 10th, the nominees for the 2017 Billboard Music Awards have been announced, and Ariana is nominated for three awards! Check out all of the categories she is up for and the nominees she’s going against.

Top Artist Nominees 

Adele
Beyonce
Justin Bieber
The Chainsmokers
Drake
Ariana Grande
Shawn Mendes
Rihanna
Twenty one pilots
The weeknd

Top Female Artist Nominees

Adele
Beyonce
Ariana Grande
Rihanna
Sia

Top Social Artist Nominees

Justin Bieber
BTS
Selena Gomez
Ariana Grande
Shawn Mendes

Voting for the Top Social Artist award will be open on May 1st.

Bia talks opening up for Ariana Grande on the Dangerous Woman Tour with Billboard

On March 22nd, Bia had an interview with Billboard, as she talks about her upcoming tour with Ariana Grande, advice from Pharrell, and her collaboration with J Balvin at the South by Southwest 2017.

Interviewer: It was announced that you are doing some tour dates with Ariana Grande.

Bia: That is my girl. I love her so much and she is such a dope soul inside and out. She’s a beautiful person. I’m just honoured to be on her tour. It’s such an amazing show. She puts so much work in. She’s one of the most hardest working girls I know, so it’s just so amazing to see it. She actually brought me out during her set and performed a song off of my EP called Esta Noche.  Her fans know all of the words already. We haven’t put out the song yet!

Bryan Hearns talks designing Ariana Grande’s Dangerous Woman Tour outfits

On February 6th, an interview by Billboard was posted as they interviewed Ariana’s outfit designer Bryan Hearns about how he made the Dangerous Woman tour outfits. Check it all below:


Bryan Hearns is no newbie to designing for celebs. The FIDM University alumnus stayed in Los Angeles after graduating in 2010 and linked up with Style PR’s Antonio Estebán, who acquainted Hearns with the many names he works with today. From Keke Palmer to Kylie Jenner to Selena Gomez, the 26-year-old has had no shortage of it-girls to dress in his eclectic designs.

The new year came with another challenge for Hearns: dressing Ariana Grande for her Dangerous Woman tour, which kicked off Thursday in Phoenix. Grande is no stranger to his work: She rocked Hearns’ designs on Billboard‘s August 2014 cover and donned a custom top by him at the iHeartRadio Jingle Ball. When Hearns was approached by Law Roach, Grande’s stylist, to develop her Dangerous Woman tour outfits, it was a match made in fashion heaven. Hearns discusses working with the pop star, his favorite look from the tour, and the difference between creating his beloved street style and designing performance wear.

What was the collaborative process like while creating Ariana’s tour looks?

I met with Law and we discussed the direction she wants to go in. She’s trying to do a different direction with her style, and this tour kind of encompasses all of that. It’s kind of street style — everything that’s happening now. So we had a meeting and went over the images and silhouettes that she likes.

What was it like working with Law?

It was awesome. He has a really good sense of direction. He lets you know if he likes something or not, but he also gives you your freedom to create what you want.

So were you given a lot of creative freedom for this tour?

Yeah. Most of the looks are my direct aesthetic, so I put my stamp on it. It was just a certain silhouette that she wanted and certain colors, and that’s how we met in the middle. We had a couple of looks that were in her silhouette, which is usually high-waisted bodysuits, shorts, skirts and crop tops. It’s very flattering on her so we have a lot of items in that shape.

What materials did you use?

Everything was a mixture of leather, denim, strappy fabrics (because there’s a lot of straps on everything) and hardware. We use a lot of sweatshirt fabric because everything is very relaxed-looking. It doesn’t have a lot going on in terms of the details.

What would be three words you’d use to describe the collection?

Confident, feminine and dangerous.

What is your favorite look from the tour collection?

I think my favorite one is going to be the white two-piece. It’s a crop top and a bodysuit skirt with a leather flap. She’s also wearing it with a big puffer jacket. It’s all white and it’s super crispy with thigh-high boots. It just looks really chic.

How long did it take to put all of these looks together?

It was pretty quick because I heard about the job maybe two and half weeks ago and we had to scramble and get everything ready to go. So we’ve been working all the way up to today, and the show’s in a couple of hours and we’re still getting last-minute things done.

Wow, that’s really intense. What’s it like to work under that kind of pressure?

It’s kind of stressful, but it’s also exciting because you have to problem-solve really quick. Sometimes you’ll get an idea that you wouldn’t have thought about if you had more time to think because sometimes when you have a lot time, you change your mind too much and then you’re not certain on exactly what you want.

What’s the difference between designing for Ariana and other people, like Keke Palmer or Kylie Jenner?

The difference is when I design for Ariana, it’s more like a custom idea — more for performance. And then for Keke and Kylie, it’s more for streetwear and things that they would wear when they’re walking around. And they tend to wear more from my collection. Ariana is more specific to her.

When it comes to the difference between performance wear and streetwear, what’s the big difference for you in terms of designing?

You have to keep in mind that they’re going to be moving around and dancing, and things have to last for awhile, so that’s what I have to think about. The other girls were more to look cool and it’s not as comfortable maybe as it would be to perform in.

What have you learned from this experience and how have you grown?

I’ve learned just to be patient and take whatever advice or direction someone’s trying to give you. Just problem-solve and go for it.

Source: Billboard.com

Ariana Grande listed in Billboard’s 2016 Year End Charts

On December 8th, Billboard published their 2016 Year End Charts, which are a cumulative measure of a single or album’s performance in the United States during the year. Ariana has made many lists with the success of her album Dangerous Woman. Check out where she has been ranked in!

Top Artists

7. Ariana Grande

Top Artists – Female

4. Ariana Grande

Hot 100 Songs

36. Ariana Grande – Dangerous Woman
51. Ariana Grande – Into You
77. Ariana Grande – Side To Side (feat. Nicki Minaj)

Hot 100 Artists

10. Ariana Grande

Top Billboard 200 Albums

26. Ariana Grande – Dangerous Woman

Top Billboard 200 Artists

31. Ariana Grande

Radio Songs

35. Ariana Grande – Dangerous Woman
55. Ariana Grande – Into You

Radio Songs Artists

12. Ariana Grande

Digital Songs

36. Ariana Grande – Dangerous Woman

Digital Songs Artists

16. Ariana Grande

Streaming Songs

41. Ariana Grande – Into You
57. Ariana Grande – Dangerous Woman
58. Ariana Grande – Side To Side (feat. Nicki Minaj)

Streaming Songs Artists

11. Ariana Grande

Top Twitter Tracks

7. Ariana Grande – Dangerous Woman
10. Ariana Grande – Into You
18. Ariana Grande – Side To Side (feat. Nicki Minaj)

Social 50 Artists

2. Ariana Grande

On-Demand Songs

35. Ariana Grande – Into You

On-Demand Songs Artists

10. Ariana Grande

Pop Songs

21. Ariana Grande – Dangerous Woman
35. Ariana Grande – Into You

Pop Songs Artists

7. Ariana Grande

Adult Contemporary Songs

41. Nathan Sykes – Over And Over Again (feat. Ariana Grande)

Rhythmic Songs

50. Ariana Grande – Dangerous Woman

Rhythmic Artists

10. Ariana Grande

Dance Club Artists

16. Ariana Grande

Dance Club Songs

26. Nathan Sykes – Over And Over Again (feat. Ariana Grande)

Dance/Mix Show Songs

48. Ariana Grande – Into You

 Japan Hot 100

61. Ariana Grande – Break Free (feat. Zedd)

Canadian Hot 100

30. Ariana Grande – Into You
41. Ariana Grande – Dangerous Woman
55. Ariana Grande – Side To Side (feat. Nicki Minaj)
87. Ariana Grande – Focus

Canadian Hot 100 Artists

8. Ariana Grande

Top Canadian Albums

18. Ariana Grande – Dangerous Woman

Ryan Tedder talks working with Stevie Wonder & Ariana Grande with Billboard

On September 29th, frontman and hitmaker Ryan Tedder, 37, opens up about working with Ariana and Stevie Wonder in a Billboard interview. Check it out below!

This has been a big year for you, but what was the highlight? 
The thing that I’m probably the most proud of, other than finishing our album, happened about five weeks ago with Stevie Wonder and Ariana Grande. I did a song, “Faith,” for them to sing for an upcoming [animated] movie called Sing. Stevie came in around 6 p.m., Ariana arrived at 10, and we stayed up until 3 in the morning and talked music for hours.

Ariana Grande performs at 2016 Billboard’s Hot 100 Festival

On August 20th, Ariana Grande performed at the Billboard’s Hot 100 Festival, as she performed many of her hits.

Ariana Grande’s set was just under an hour of pure pop power. It was all killer, no filler, just one hit after another. Her vocal runs were judiciously delivered, and the old-school fly backup dancers could have won a gold medal for synchronized swimming (had they been in water). When she launched into “Into You,” that sensuous punch of dance-pop pleasure had the rabid crowd of fans flipping their shit, alternating between dancing and trying to Snap the moment. The dancing won out.

While performing her breakthrough hit “The Way,” Ariana Grande was joined by the song’s original guest star, Mac Miller, who came out for an unexpected appearance to rap his part.

Check out the UHQ photos + videos below!

Performance


Backstage

Ariana Grande performs at the Billboard Music Awards 2016

On May 22nd, Ariana Grande performed at the 2016 Billboard Music Awards held a T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas. She was nominated for 2 awards but unfortunately lost in both categories. She also graced the red carpet followed by interviews.

She performed her two current biggest hits Dangeorus Woman and Into You! Check out the UHQ photos and videos below!

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Red Carpet




PERFORMANCE

 

Backstage